Monthly Archives: June 2016

LAPD Is Testing Tesla Model S P85D Police Cars

The LAPD is eyeing Tesla’s fastest, most powerful Model S as a potential pursuit vehicle. Extension cord not included.

tesla-model-s-police-car image www.policesearch.net

The LAPD has apparently been impressed enough with the Tesla Model S that it’s considering using them as police cars. The police department has been testing two high-performance P85D sedans for more than a year.

Speaking with CNBC, LAPD Police Administrator Vartan Yegiyan said:

Tesla definitely stepped up and gave us the Model S to do some evaluation with them. To assess the vehicle’s performance in our environment and to learn what are the drawbacks and positives of this type of vehicle in our fleet operation. Not only on the regular transportation side, but also the future in the high-pursuit-rated vehicle arena.

Partly due to its high price, the Model S won’t see official duty for a while, but the LAPD already sees its potential in the long run.

“Is it practical now? No,” said Yegiyan. But in “the next three to five years . . . not only will the industry push toward electrification, but prices will drop on vehicles. While that’s occurring we’ll be in the space learning and contributing to the process.”

With the price of a Model S P85D pushing $100,000, it’s understandable that police departments would want to hold off on adding them to their fleets. Even loaded with all the necessary police equipment, an Explorer-based Ford Police Interceptor still costs less than half that price.

But when it becomes reasonable to begin using electric police cars, the LAPD wants to be ready. It’s is also testing a BMW i3, and police officers are already using several electric motorcycles and scooters around the city.

bmw-electric-police-car image www.policesearch.net

“In California, there’s pressure from above and there’s also a desire on the part of the (electric vehicle) manufacturers to get their vehicles out there,” Tom Libby, an analyst at IHS Automotive, told CNBC.

But don’t expect conventional automakers like Ford and Dodge to let Tesla move in on law enforcement fleet sales without a fight. “We are a leader in law enforcement, and we intend to remain the leader,” Randy Freiburger, Ford police and ambulance fleet supervisor, told CNBC.

CCD

Henry Sapiecha

www.crimefiles.net

POLICE CHARGE NAKED WOMAN WITH DRINK DRIVING OFFENSE IN AUSTRALIA

car-keys-&-alcohol image www.policesearch.net

A CASINO woman was completely naked and told police she’d had 10 schooners of beer, two cans of beer and a whole bottle of wine when she was pulled over while driving along Johnston St in Casino earlier this year.

Just after midnight on February 20, police patrolling the Casino CBD noticed a Holden Commodore sedan driving extremely slowly, without its headlights on.

Cynthia Fay Dickson was stopped by police when she turned into Walker St.

When an officer approached Dickson’s Commodore, he noticed she was completely naked and affected by alcohol, police facts stated.

“The accused did not have one stitch of clothing on or any footwear, her speech was slurred and difficult to understand, her eyes were glassy/bloodshot and the vehicle reeked of alcohol,” police facts tendered yesterday before Casino Local Court stated.

Dickson then underwent a roadside breath test, which returned a positive high-range reading.

She was arrested and given a blanket to cover herself, while she was taken to Casino police station for a second breath test.

In an interview with police, Dickson said she had 10 schooners of XXXX beer at a Casino pub, before going home and having two cans of XXXX beer and a full bottle of wine.

Officers were told this occurred between 5.30pm and 11.25pm the evening before, and she hadn’t eaten during that time.

Despite being clearly affected by alcohol, police facts said Dickson was open about why she was naked: “When questioned about her naked state, the accused was rather calm and collected, indicating to police she simply decided to go for a drive to Lismore.”

At Casino police station, Dickson registered a mid-range blood alcohol reading of 0.135.

When she was told about the result of the breath test Dickson had more words with police.

“That’s bad, I am fu**ed,” police facts stated.

“Who cares, you just learn not to do it again.”

When Dickson appeared before Magistrate David Heilpern at Casino Local Court yesterday, she pleaded guilty to mid-range drink driving.

She told the court she had completed the Traffic Offenders Program, which was an “eye opener” for her into what could have been a tragedy the night she was arrested.

GIRL SHOPPING

Henry Sapiecha

www.crimefiles.net

Ford Mustang loses its police stripes after overheating within minutes of a simulated pursuit in Australia

ford mustang police car image www.policesearch.net

THE Ford Mustang may be in hot demand but it won’t be in hot pursuit.

The iconic US muscle car has lost its police stripes after failing a critical test at the final hurdle before it could become a highway patrol vehicle.

NSW Police are now likely to be driving Volvo sedans and wagons, after their highway patrol counterparts in Queensland took delivery of five Swedish cars last month as part of a trial.

News Corp Australia has been told the Ford Mustang passed a brake test in the simulated pursuit at the police driving academy in Goulburn, however the automatic transmission overheated after just two laps, or about three minutes of driving.

The Mustang was then taken to the local Ford dealership in Goulburn for repairs after the performance flagship went into “limp home mode”.

While Ford is now holding a record 6000 orders in Australia for the Mustang — pushing the waiting list to 18 months — none will join NSW Police ranks after failing the endurance test, which is conducted for safety reasons before a car can be put into police service.

The future of the Ford Mustang bought by NSW Police for the trial is unclear. It may be used as a show pony at road safety displays, or could be stripped of its livery and sold.

police car with stripes image www.policesearch.net

The Ford Mustang was one of a number of vehicles police are considering to replace Holden Commodore and Ford Falcon pursuit cars, once they go out of production.

The Holden Commodore and Ford Falcon have been a staple of highway patrol fleets across Australia for decades, with more than 1000 in use nationally.

The Mustang’s police test failure means Ford will miss out on a large slice of the market it has previously dominated.

While cars like the Toyota Camry will replace general duties police sedans, finding suitable highway patrol vehicles is more difficult because the Falcon and Commodore have a lot of performance for the price.

Once the Ford production line closes in October 2016 and the Holden production line closes in late 2017, police will be forced to drive imported cars.

Ford spokesman Wes Sherwood told News Corp Australia the Mustang “was not specially engineered for police use” and described the test as “extreme” as it involves “more than twice the amount of braking manoeuvres as the global standard”. Ford had to make upgrades to the brakes and transmission cooling to the current Falcon before it passed the police test.

Mr Sherwood added: “We are confident Mustang would help officers chase down bad guys if put into service”.

NSW Police said it would not comment as the evaluation process for highway patrol replacement vehicles was “ongoing”.

Last week, police in Victoria became the envy of their colleagues after taking delivery of a $200,000 Mercedes SUV that can sprint from 0 to 100kmh in a Porsche-like 4.2 seconds.

But it did not cost taxpayers one cent because it was donated by Mercedes for a 12-month trial.

kchtr

Henry Sapiecha