Category Archives: PHONES

NSW Australian Police go high-tech … with mobile phones

Sure, it's pretty, but my real-life notebook works better with leather gloves.

Sure, it’s pretty, but my real-life notebook works better with leather gloves.

In what it has dubbed “new era” and a “significant step forward” in “real-time” policing, NSW Police will roll out 500 Samsung Galaxy Note 4 phablets to select members of the force.

The smartphones will be handed out to police within specialist units including mounted and motorcycle response squads, dog unit, gangs squad, transport, traffic and highway patrol, and domestic and family violence teams, as well as local and regional enforcement squads.

The lucky officers will no longer have to traipse back to the car to use their clunky in-car police computer. Instead, they’ll be able to access police databases to do background checks and more, right from the device in the palm of their hand.

Add me on Facebook?: NSW Police goes mobile.

Add me on Facebook?: NSW Police goes mobile.

“They can also be used to send text messages, make phone calls and access the internet,” NSW Police said in a statement.

As a security measure, sensitive data on the smartphones can be erased remotely if a device is lost or stolen. GPS capabilities also allow better tracking of team members.

Officers will of course reap the many other benefits of using smartphones on the job long enjoyed by other professionals, including journalists – such as being able to take photos and record video and audio on the go.

NSW Police is testing cloud-based mobile access to databases for background checks.

NSW Police is testing cloud-based mobile access to databases for background checks.

The device also comes with a stylus, allowing force members to take notes by hand and then digitise them, for better record keeping.

A NSW Police spokesperson said these advantages would not replace the need for specialist forensic services such as crime scene photographers but could be used as “a follow-up tool for ongoing inquiries”.

“This technology will help police fight and prevent crime in our community and I look forward to seeing its positive effect on operational policing throughout the coming weeks,” NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione said.

A police spokesperson said the trial rollout was to determine what advantages and efficiencies the mobiles would provide on-the-beat officers in their daily tasks, with the potential for “possibly rolling it out further” if it were successful.

There is just one potential problem we can see as to the viability of this high-tech proposal – and that’s that the Note 4 is a sizeable phone with a 5.7-inch screen that doesn’t easily fit in one’s pocket.

The NSW Police spokesperson reassured us their response teams often wore utility vests and otherwise had “cargo-type” uniforms with plenty of room to stash their gear.

One hopes management doesn’t have plans to start trialling Samsung Gear VR virtual reality headsets, which are compatible only with the Samsung Galaxy Note 4; that could get messy.

Rumour has it that Samsung will unveil two brand new smartphones at the Mobile World way”

ooo

Henry Sapiecha

FRANTIC CALL FOR HELP FROM POLICE CAME AS A PIZZA DELIVERY ORDER

Abused woman disguises pizza order to call police

A woman called 911 and pretended to order a pizza to alert the police that her abusive boyfriend was assaulting her.

Reporting domestic violence is often easier said than done but one woman in the United States found a way to fool her abusive partner by disguising her call for help as a pizza order.

Keith Weisinger, who worked as a police dispatcher between 2004-2006, said that when he took the call he thought the woman on the other end of the line may have been playing a prank but fortunately he didn’t hang up.

“This call occurred almost 10 years ago,” he told BuzzFeed News. “I worked the graveyard shift, 6pm–6am, and I remember this call being pretty late – close to midnight.”

After noticing the woman’s hurried responses Weisinger realised the pizza order was a coded call for help.

Cartoon illustrates domestic violence

According to the 911 operator here is how the conversation went down, as first posted on Reddit thread ‘911 Operators, what is the 1 call that you could never forget?’:

“911, where is your emergency?”

“123 Main St [actual address not given].”

“Ok, what’s going on there?”

“I’d like to order a pizza for delivery.” (oh great, another prank call).

“Ma’am, you’ve reached 911”

“Yeah, I know. Can I have a large with half pepperoni, half mushroom and peppers?”

“Ummm…. I’m sorry, you know you’ve called 911 right?

“Yeah, do you know how long it will be?”

“Ok, Ma’am, is everything ok over there? Do you have an emergency?”

“Yes, I do.”

“…And you can’t talk about it because there’s someone in the room with you?” (moment of realization

“Yes, that’s correct. Do you know how long it will be?”

“I have an officer about a mile from your location. Are there any weapons in your house?”

“Nope.”

“Can you stay on the phone with me?”

“Nope. See you soon, thanks”

Weisinger said he checked the history of the address and noticed it had domestic violence-related episodes in the past.

“The officer arrives and finds a couple, female was kind of banged up, and boyfriend was drunk,” his Reddit post reveals.

“Officer arrests him after she explains that the boyfriend had been beating her for a while. I thought she was pretty clever to use that trick.

“Definitely one of the most memorable calls,” he added.

While occasionally callers make an effort to meet the dispatchers who helped them through a distressing experience Weisinger, who now works as an environmental attorney, said he never found out what happened to the woman believed to be in her 30s.

“This is a part of the job most 911 dispatchers find frustrating. Beyond the immediate resolution – arrest, hospitalisation, etc – we rarely hear what happens to the people who call,” he told BuzzFeed.

And while he is being hailed a hero, Weisinger says it was the woman caller’s fast thinking that saved her.

“Whether she had thought of this trick before, or it just came to her she indicated the urgency of her situation without giving away the true purpose of her call.”

“Yeah, do you know how long it will be?”

“Ok, Ma’am, is everything ok over there? Do you have an emergency?

“Yes, I do.”

“…And you can’t talk about it because there’s someone in the room with you?” (moment of realization)

“Yes, that’s correct. Do you know how long it will be?”

“I have an officer about a mile from your location. Are there any weapons in your house?”

“Nope.”

“Can you stay on the phone with me?”

“Nope. See you soon, thanks”

Weisinger said he checked the history of the address and noticed it had domestic violence-related episodes in the past.

“The officer arrives and finds a couple, female was kind of banged up, and boyfriend was drunk,” his Reddit post reveals.

“Officer arrests him after she explains that the boyfriend had been beating her for a while. I thought she was pretty clever to use that trick.

“Definitely one of the most memorable calls,” he added.

While occasionally callers make an effort to meet the dispatchers who helped them through a distressing experience Weisinger, who now works as an environmental attorney, said he never found out what happened to the woman believed to be in her 30s.

“This is a part of the job most 911 dispatchers find frustrating. Beyond the immediate resolution – arrest, hospitalisation, etc – we rarely hear what happens to the people who call,” he told BuzzFeed.

And while he is being hailed a hero, Weisinger says it was the woman caller’s fast thinking that saved her.

“Whether she had thought of this trick before, or it just came to her she indicated the urgency of her situation without giving away the true purpose of her call

OOO

Henry Sapiecha

New radar mobile phone gun to catch texting drivers to be in the hands of police

next-generation radar gun could show police if drivers are using mobile phones. image www.policesearch.net

A next-generation radar gun could show police if drivers are using mobile phones.

Police could soon be equipped with a hand-held device to catch drivers using their phone behind the wheel.

The US-based Virginian Pilot newspaper reports that a small tech firm is blending electronic cable repair technology with police equipment to create a new tool for law enforcement.

ComSonics, which works to calibrate radar guns and other police equipment, says its technology is “close to production”.

Based around sensors used to detect radio emissions leaking from damaged electronic cables, the device could show police which cars are actively using mobile phone data.

The company says there are no real privacy concerns surrounding its proposal as the device cannot decode information such as text messages.

texting phone in hand image www.intelagencies.com

But there could be practical hurdles surrounding such a device.

ComSonics presented its technology at a distracted driving summit in Virginia, where it told delegates that there were several hurdles to clear surrounding use of the technology.

It’s not clear whether it would be able to reveal whether a driver or passenger is using a phone, or whether drivers are using phones legally, through Bluetooth or dock-based systems.

Colorado-based entrepreneur Scott Tibbits has proposed a different solution.

His company, Katasi, has developed a system that will lock incoming calls or text messages to mobile phones while cars are on the move. The system involves a small black box that connects to a car’s onboard diagnostics port before blocking incoming mobile traffic to the driver’s handset.

Passengers are free to use phones as the system can learn a family’s patterns and movements before deducing who is driving the car – such as a teenager driving home from school – while using GPS sensors to check if a phone is moving or stationary.

Police in NSW fine around 1000 drivers each week for mobile phone use. Transport for NSW statistics suggest that four people were killed and 66 injured between 2006 and 2010 as a result of drivers using mobile phones.

Henry Sapiecha

POLICE NEED SEARCH WARRANT TO GO THROUGH PERSONS MOBILE PHONE RECORDS

Warrant needed for mobile phone search: US

mobile phone worker user image www.policesearch.net
Washington: In a sweeping victory for privacy rights in the digital age, the United States Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the police need warrants to search the mobile phones of people they arrest.

While the decision will offer protection to the 12 million people arrested every year, many for minor crimes, its impact will most likely be much broader. The ruling almost certainly also applies to searches of tablet and laptop computers, and its reasoning may apply to searches of homes and businesses and of information held by third parties like phone companies.

“This is a bold opinion,” said Orin Kerr, a law professor at George Washington University. “It is the first computer-search case, and it says we are in a new digital age. You can’t apply the old rules anymore.”

Mobile phones deserve the same protection against “unreasonable searches and seizures” as other personal property – for example homes – enshrined in the US constitution’s Fourth Amendment, the top US court said on Wednesday.

The court, in two cases involving criminal suspects whose mobile handsets were searched by police, weighed the interest of law enforcement in finding important evidence against the civil liberties guaranteed in the constitution.

Chief Justice John Roberts jnr, writing for the court, was keenly alert to the central role mobile phones play in contemporary life. They are, he said, “such a pervasive and insistent part of daily life that the proverbial visitor from Mars might conclude they were an important feature of human anatomy”.

But he added that old principles required that their contents be protected from routine searches. One of the driving forces behind the American Revolution,  he wrote, was revulsion against “general warrants,” which “allowed British officers to rummage through homes in an unrestrained search for evidence of criminal activity”.

“The fact that technology now allows an individual to carry such information in his hand,” the chief justice also wrote, “does not make the information any less worthy of the protection for which the founders fought.”

“Our answer to the question of what police must do before searching a [mobile] phone seized incident to an arrest is accordingly simple – get a warrant,” he wrote.

The American Civil Liberties Union hailed the decision as important for constitutional rights, while the Centre for Democracy and Technology called the ruling “a tremendous victory for privacy rights”.

Yousry Zakhary of the International Association of Chiefs of Police said the ruling was “disappointing and will undoubtedly impact law enforcement’s ability to investigate and combat crime”.

Meanwhile, the US Congress passed a law offering whistleblower protections for government intelligence employees, a move cheered by supporters of former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

The House of Representatives voted late on Tuesday to pass the provision authorising the US government’s intelligence activities for the 2015 budget year, which begins on October 1. Section VI forbids firing, demoting or other reprisals against any intelligence worker who reports violations of federal law, wasting of funds or any activity that puts the public in danger to the inspector-general of agencies such as the National Security Agency or Central Intelligence Agency.

“It’s a no-brainer to restore safe alternatives to illegal leaks,” said Tom Devine of the Government Accountability Project, which defends Mr Snowden.

But non-staff contractors, such as Mr Snowden during his time working for the NSA, are not covered by the new protections.

New York Times, AFP

Henry Sapiecha