Category Archives: POLICE METHODS

TAC suspends police funding after it was revealed that officers faked 258,000 breath tests

iT IS NOT CLEAR IF THE DELIBERATE FALSE READINGS WERE TO SAVE THE MOTORISTS OR GET EXTRA CONVICTIONS FOR THE STATE TO RAISE REVENUE.FORMER IS TRUE,THEN OK. IT WOULD SEEM THAT MORE TESTS WERE DONE BY OFFICERS ON THEMSELVES TO MEET QUOTAS FOR NUMBERS TESTED

The Transport Accident Commission has suspended its funding to Victoria Police following revelations officers falsified more than a quarter of a million roadside breath tests.

The Age revealed that more than 258,000 alcohol breath tests were faked over 5½ years, in what appears to be a rather deliberate ruse to dupe the system.

In the wake of the scandal, $4 million in annual funding the TAC gives to police for road safety measures has been put on hold, the head of Victoria Police’s Professional Standards Command, Assistant Commissioner Russell Barrett, confirmed.

“The TAC have suspended funding of our operations at this point, and we’re currently working through that with them to give them some reassurances,” Mr Barrett said.

Meanwhile, an external investigator has been appointed to probe the breath-testing scandal. Former Victoria Police chief commissioner Neil Comrie will look into how the behaviour was condoned & allowed to occur and what the force could do to improve operational practice in the future.

“I had not heard of our members engaging in such practiceSs. We let ourselves down, we’ve let the community down. It stops now,” Mr Barrett told The Age on Wednesday night.

An audit found that in many situations, officers had blown into breath test units themselves or actually tampered with the test devices.

“Victoria Police doesn’t set quotas at local levels broadly,” Mr Barrett said on Thursday. “If local members, local managers set a target for members, then that’s a matter for local areas.”

The police findings represent about 1.5 per cent of the 17.7 million breath tests conducted.

Police said about 1500 preliminary breath test devices were analysed during the internal investigation.

Police Association secretary Wayne Gatt said the faked tests were the result of “critically under-resourced”, over-worked officers trying to meet unrealistic targets.

“Call them whatever you want, targets, quotas, objectives. It’s no lie, every individual van across the state gets told that they have to target PBTs … it is wrong to say it doesn’t happen. It does happen. It happens every shift,” he told radio station 3AW.

“They’ve had a dramatic increase in the amount of tests required out on the street. Asking the same amount of people to do more, if follows this sort of behaviour is likely to occur.”

He said he did not believe the members who faked the tests should be stood down.

“I dont think it’s criminal. It’s not fraud… no one is paid for the amount of tests they do. None of our members have a direct financial or other benefits from any of this.

“It’s the wrong thing to do, but it’s a far cry from criminality.”

Victoria Police Minister Lisa Neville labelled the actions an “unacceptable breach of trust.”

“This conduct is extremely disappointing and unacceptable — it’s wrong, it’s a breach of trust, and it won’t be tolerated,” Ms Neville said.

While Ms Neville welcomed an independent investigation into the officers’ behaviour, she said there was no evidence to suggest their alleged conduct had affected drink-driving prosecutions.

But opposition police spokesman Edward O’Donohue said the breach raised plenty of questions.

“The integrity, not only of our police but our road safety regime, is paramount and it is up to Daniel Andrews to make sure this is thoroughly investigated,” Mr O’Donohue said.

The Transport Accident Commission raised concerns with Victoria Police after they found an anomaly in data late last year, Mr Barrett said.

It sparked the audit of the past 5½ years of data from the breathalyser devices.

Mr Barrett said the audit found a suspicious number of breath tests were being conducted in quick succession

Usually there should be a space of time between each test, to take into account an officer talking to a driver and breathalysing them, before moving on to the next car, he said.

But the faked tests occurred one after the other.

Mr Barrett said he believed officers were faking the tests to make themselves appear busier.

“The question we all asked was, ‘Why?’ There could be a number of reasons but the main rationale I believe is to hide or highlight productivity,” he said.

“Whatever reason our workforce may come up with, it isn’t acceptable.”

It is believed self-testing was largely undertaken by police on general duties or highway patrol members, with some rural areas overrepresented in the available data.

The practice was not common at supervised drug and alcohol bus testing sites, police stated.

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Henry Sapiecha

Video shows Virginia Police Caught PLANTING Drugs – 6/2014 CORRUPTION

DRUG DOG FOUND NOTHING IN CAR BUT VIRGINIA POLICE SAID THEY DID

[UPDATE 5.3.16: You cannot see the HILARIOUS annotations on mobile – so watch on desktop, for all the details & funny pop-ups. YES, the case was dropped once this video was shown to the Asst. D.A., There were NEVER any drugs to begin with & if they’re were I’m sure the K9’s nose would’ve been ALOT better than these 2 dirty cop’s noses. Also, I was instructed by my Atty. that with the Judges & Cops in that town; a Civil suit would’ve been a waste of time. I support cops as we need them/but loathe biased thugs hiding behind badges.] POLICE ARE SUPPOSED TO PROTECT & SERVE – NOT – PLANT EVIDENCE & POLICE PROFILE. This is personal to me/I’ll tell you why. In June I was illegally stopped while bird dogging RE properties with a white female Co-worker (Driver & owner) in a VERY rural part of VA. We were followed by an unmarked car so we voluntarily pulled over to allow him to pass. We were detained, searched for weapons & drugs and when that turned up nothing & instead of being allowed to drive away – 4 cruisers pulled up with a the K-9 dog and they proceeded to walk the dog inside & out. RESULT- That turned up nothing. So 2 cops ripped the car apart, looking for God knows what on the side of a country road for 1.5hrs and 5 other cops on standby in tactical gear. Picture 1 cop working the driver’s side & the other on the passenger side. After ripping through the car, the passenger side cop (Jr. officer) walks away and leaves his superior to finish. After finding NOTHING; the superior officer walks back to his squad car, the Jr. officer steps over to him, mumbles under his breath & the Superior officer bolts to the passenger side floorboard (my seat) and miraculously finds a morsel of marijuana. Something the dog & the other cop didn’t detect. He puts it in a tester, claims it to be Marijuana and that b/c it was found on MY side of the car—says ‘he’s giving me a citation for possession’. Why not arrest me –BECAUSE apparently the quantity was so small. WEIRD – So ask yourself, how is it a passenger with No marijuana (furthermore – 2 Non users), get pulled over for tinted windows (ONLY after I questioned the stop, the officer replied, give me your I.D. –UNFORTUNATELY for them I had NO warrants etc.), has a K-9 dog & 2 cops search the car with NO results UNTIL 1 officer does something blatantly illegal WEIRDER – So ask yourself, how is it the officer on the driver’s side of the car, magically finds marijuana a dog couldn’t discover? WEIRDEST – After paying $1500 to a lawyer, the VA Prosecutor dropped the charges knowing there was a video. BUT NOW, I’M SADDLED WITH EXPUNGING THIS RIDICULOUS CHARGE FROM MY RECORD—ANOTHER FEE, and get this – Since Virginia is a Commonwealth, they reserve the right to DENY my request! Ps: So I guess June 25th was my day to get a drug arrest record, BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY! Pss: The Jr. cop (whom I believe planted the so-called Marijuana) even asked to see the vid –I suppose he wanted to see IF he was caught on tape & YES, it’s all on video. HAHA, these guys really think they’re cowboys. PIECE de RESISITANCE – I RECORDED IT ON HD Iphone VIDEO – So after some serious thought, I decided to post the video of (2) Virginia cops planting evidence and make them celebrities.

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Henry Sapiecha

NEVER TALK TO POLICE – HERE’S WHY as an EXPERIENCED LAWYER & LAW PROFESSOR EXPLAINS IN THIS DETAILED VIDEO

Law Professor James Duane gives viewers startling reasons why they should always exercise their 5th Amendment rights when questioned by government officials.

Law Professor James Duane gives a video presentation as to why you should not talk to the police

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Henry Sapiecha

Know your rights when pulled over by police?AUSTRALIA

police-search-advice image www.policesearch.net

The flashing red-and-blues of a police car in the rear-view mirror have the unique effect of making even the most innocent of drivers feel like Pablo Escobar with a boot packed to overflowing with white powder.

But that sinking feeling is magnified a thousand times over when it’s blended with the crushing realisation that you have, in fact, committed an offence worthy of the constabulary’s attention. Your once clear mind becomes a swirling mix of harried excuses and accidental admissions of guilt as, dreading the worst, your sweaty hands shakily hand over your licence.

And while we would never advocate committing an offence behind the wheel of a car, or make excuses for those who do, we equally realise that mistakes can happen, and it’s important to know your rights when pulled over by police, whether you’ve done something wrong or not.

The below advice is a general summary, but it’s important to be across the specific legislation in your state or territory. The police pull-over procedure, and your specific rights and obligations, can vary, and it’s always a good idea to seek professional advice, should you ever need it.

Since the introduction of the random breath test, a police officer can pull you over anytime they’ like.

“Every state has its own legislation and obligations, so it is important to investigate the specifics pertinent to where you live,” says Andrew Tiedt, a partner at Armstrong Legal in Sydney.

“But remember, there’s nothing wrong with saying to the police, “Do I have to let you do this?”. If they say, “Can I search your car?” there’s nothing wrong with asking if you can refuse their request.

“Finally, don’t answer questions you don’t have to answer. There’s nothing you can say in that moment that will improve your chances in a later court hearing. You can only harm them. So go home, think it over, seek professional advice and then figure out the best approach from there.”

The below answers some of the most common questions surrounding your rights and the police in Australia.

When can you be pulled over?

There was once a time when, in order to be stopped by police, there needed to be a reason – or, to use legal parlance, you’d need to have given them probable cause (be it speeding, driving erratically or doing something illegal) – for a police officer to stop you. So, if you were to scream past a police car with a radar gun, cross double white lines or were spotted not wearing a seatbelt, using a phone or looking generally suspicious, you could be stopped.

But since the introduction of the random breath test, a police officer can pull you over anytime they’d like to administer the breath alcohol exam, and that means you no longer need to have done anything wrong before being stopped.

What are my rights if I’m stopped?

First things first, you don’t need to answer any questions, nor provide any personal information, other than your name and address. You are also required by law to hand over your driver’s licence so police can check you’re telling them the truth. So, what happens if you get pulled over without a license? Driving without your licence can be an offence, and can cost you cash.

While you don’t have to volunteer information, it’s always a judgement call as to whether you want to aggravate the situation by not answering menial and non-incriminating questions, especially if you’ve done nothing wrong. The same goes for those wondering if they can video police in Australia during a traffic stop. While not illegal to film your interaction with police, it’s also likely to inflame the situation, so a judgement call will be required.

If you don’t pull over when asked, however, things take a far more serious turn. In NSW, for example, a new law known as Skye’s Law (named for a toddler killed by a car evading a police stop) includes stiff penalties, including up to three years in prison for the first offence, five years if you have been convicted of a major offence in the preceding five years, as well as a lengthy driving disqualification.

What are my rights when pulled over by police?

The flashing red-and-blues of a police car in the rear-view mirror have the unique effect of making even the most innocent of drivers feel like Pablo Escobar with a boot packed to overflowing with white powder.

But that sinking feeling is magnified a thousand times over when it’s blended with the crushing realisation that you have, in fact, committed an offence worthy of the constabulary’s attention. Your once clear mind becomes a swirling mix of harried excuses and accidental admissions of guilt as, dreading the worst, your sweaty hands shakily hand over your licence.

And while we would never advocate committing an offence behind the wheel of a car, or make excuses for those who do, we equally realise that mistakes can happen, and it’s important to know your rights when pulled over by police, whether you’ve done something wrong or not.

The below advice is a general summary, but it’s important to be across the specific legislation in your state or territory. The police pull-over procedure, and your specific rights and obligations, can vary, and it’s always a good idea to seek professional advice, should you ever need it.

Since the introduction of the random breath test, a police officer can pull you over anytime they like.

POLICE-PULLING-OVER-MOTORISTS IMAGE www.policesearch.net

“Every state has its own legislation and obligations, so it is important to investigate the specifics pertinent to where you live,” says Andrew Tiedt, a partner at Armstrong Legal in Sydney.

“But remember, there’s nothing wrong with saying to the police, “Do I have to let you do this?”. If they say, “Can I search your car?” there’s nothing wrong with asking if you can refuse their request.

“Finally, don’t answer questions you don’t have to answer. There’s nothing you can say in that moment that will improve your chances in a later court hearing. You can only harm them. So go home, think it over, seek professional advice and then figure out the best approach from there.”

The below answers some of the most common questions surrounding your rights and the police in Australia.

When can you be pulled over?

There was once a time when, in order to be stopped by police, there needed to be a reason – or, to use legal parlance, you’d need to have given them probable cause (be it speeding, driving erratically or doing something illegal) – for a police officer to stop you. So, if you were to scream past a police car with a radar gun, cross double white lines or were spotted not wearing a seatbelt, using a phone or looking generally suspicious, you could be stopped.

But since the introduction of the random breath test, a police officer can pull you over anytime they’d like to administer the breath alcohol exam, and that means you no longer need to have done anything wrong before being stopped.

What are my rights if I’m stopped?

First things first, you don’t need to answer any questions, nor provide any personal information, other than your name and address. You are also required by law to hand over your driver’s licence so police can check you’re telling them the truth. So, what happens if you get pulled over without a license? Driving without your licence can be an offence, and can cost you cash.

While you don’t have to volunteer information, it’s always a judgement call as to whether you want to aggravate the situation by not answering menial and non-incriminating questions, especially if you’ve done nothing wrong. The same goes for those wondering if they can video police in Australia during a traffic stop. While not illegal to film your interaction with police, it’s also likely to inflame the situation, so a judgement call will be required.

If you don’t pull over when asked, however, things take a far more serious turn. In NSW, for example, a new law known as Skye’s Law (named for a toddler killed by a car evading a police stop) includes stiff penalties, including up to three years in prison for the first offence, five years if you have been convicted of a major offence in the preceding five years, as well as a lengthy driving disqualification.

What do police check when I’m pulled over?

That nerve-wracking wait when a police officer takes your licence back to their vehicle is down to the fact that almost every traffic stop includes a check on your name and vehicle to ensure there’s no outstanding court or enforcement orders against you.

Hopefully, and mostly, there isn’t, and the officer will simply hand your licence back to you.

Can police search my car in Australia?

Once stopped, police only need to ‘reasonably suspect’ illegal activity to search your vehicle. And the term ‘reasonable’ is incredibly vague, from the driver talking quickly or even just appearing nervous, which is just about every person ever stopped by the police.

What to do if you are pulled over for a DUI test?

As mentioned above, the police can pull you over at absolutely at any moment – and without you having done anything to warrant the attention – to administer a random breath test.

It’s actually a two-, and sometimes three-stage process, and failing the roadside examination doesn’t always mean you’ll be charged with an offence. The mobile device used during a road stop in some states (the one in which you’re asked to count to 10, rather than blow into a straw) is actually only capable of measuring whether alcohol is present on your breath.

If a driver fails that ‘screening’ test, the traditional breathalyser is produced to take an official roadside reading. But if you fail, even that test won’t be produced in court, instead you’ll be arrested and taken to the closest police station (or to the command bus) where you’ll be tested a third time, the results of which will be used as evidence.

But don’t think a trip to the police station will always work in your favour. While it’s true that the only thing that can lower your blood-alcohol content is time, it’s also true that the amount of alcohol present in your blood actually increases in the period immediately after you’ve stopped drinking before it then starts to decrease, so the results of the station test could actually be worse than the roadside one.

Refuse a breath test at the side of the road, and you’ll be immediately taken to the station for an official test. Refuse that, and you’ll be charged and face heavy penalties – often worse than those for high-range drink driving.

What are my rights when I’m pulled over for speeding?

A stop for a suspicion of speeding changes your rights exactly not at all, with you still only obligated to confirm your name and home address.

And its here where you should be particularly cautious with what bonus information you offer the police. If you’re sprung by a fixed camera or radar gun, your chances of defending it in court are minimal. But in NSW, for example, police can still book you on what’s called a speed ‘estimate.’ That means the police just have to think you were speeding, and don’t need to provide any proof.

It’s these speed estimates that are the most defendable in court, but your chances of clearing a ticket plummet if you are recorded confirming you were speeding when asked by the officer.

But most important of all, and with all matters of the law, if in doubt, seek professional advice.

Ever been pulled over by the police? Tell us about your experiences HERE

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Henry Sapiecha

 

These 19 Acts Of Kindness Prove That Police Officers Are Absolutely Awesome

On a daily basis, police officers protect innocent people and put criminals away.

This is a huge and important job in and of itself, but many of them take the time to make people’s lives easier — like the cops below. Whether they’re helping a person fix a flat tire or buying essential items for the homeless, these officers go above and beyond their duties in these awesome acts of kindness.

1. An officer tied a sick old man’s shoelaces for him.

policeman-does-up-shoelaces-for-old-man image www.policesearch.net

2. These kindhearted cops raised money and bought Christmas toys for sick children at the Ronald McDonald House in NYC.

3. These officers rescued a fawn that was trapped in a storm drain.

policeman-recues-deer-fawn-from-drain image www.policesearch.net

4. Nobody from this kid’s class showed up to his birthday party, so state troopers brought a cake, presents, and even police dogs to his house and threw him a party he’ll never forget.

polise-troopers-attend-kids-birthday-when-no-one came image www.policesearch.net

5. This pig was stuck in a dumpster, but police pulled her out and one of them even adopted her.

6. A Pizza Hut driver got into a car accident, so these policemen delivered the pizza for him.

policemen-deliver-piza-after-driver-has-accident image wwwpolicesearch.net

7. When this autistic teen’s beloved Halloween lawn decoration was stolen, a thoughtful officer helped him recover it and even bought him another one for Christmas.

8. This guy bought some shoes for a homeless man and gave him one of his shirts.

9…Cop’s good deed helps father see son – YouTube

10. Officers in Saskatoon, Canada, went out of their way to escort a family of ducks through busy streets and into a safer area.

11. This man bought a little boy some food as a final act of kindness before getting killed in the line of duty.

12. This woman bought a homeless man some breakfast and kept him company.

policewoman-buys-homeless-man-food-keeps-him-company image www.policesearch.net

13. An off-duty officer risked his life to pull a man out of a burning car.

14. This officer helped a guy change his tire on a freeway.

policeman-helps-guy-change-tyre image www.policesearch.net

15. These officers came to school with this little boy to show him that he wasn’t alone. He had just lost his dad, who worked alongside them.

amarillo-policemen-with-son-of-killed-officer image www.policesearch.net

16. Not only did this officer buy some coffee for the homeless man in the background, but he also brought him shoes and art supplies because he likes to draw.

policeman-helps-homeless-man image www.policesearch.net

17. This cop helped an elderly woman cross the street to get to a 7-Eleven and then drove her back home when she was done.

policeman-helps-old-lady image www.policesearch.net

18. This adorable little boy saved his allowance for months to buy lunch for this police department, so they returned the favor by presenting him with his own cruiser.

19. These police bought with their own money groceries

Okay, the next time I see a police officer, I’m definitely going to have to give them a big high five for all the awesome work they do.

giphy-police-directing-traffic image www.policesearch.net

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Henry Sapiecha

SOME POLICE SHOOTOUT & CAR CHASE [11] VIDEOS [WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT]

1…World’s Scariest Police Shootouts Crime Documentary Videos

2…Published on Feb 27, 2014

WARNING: gun violence. World’s Scariest Police Shootouts – Crime Documentary

Most daring, dangerous, wildest, and shocking videos of police and criminal shootouts ever caught on tape.

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3…Police helicopter video shows dramatic highway shoot-out

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4…Drug addict shot dead in police hostage situation in China

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5…Published on Jan 14, 2014

DENVER — Raw video from the Denver officer-involved shooting. In the video, an unidentified man takes a woman and uses her as a shield while police yell for the man to surrender.
WARNING: This video may not be appropriate for some viewers.
As the man tries to take the woman back inside the store, an officer opens fire hitting the man. He falls to the ground, the hostage runs away and officers swarm the area.
The man was taken to Denver Health Medical Center for treatment and was listed in critical condition Monday afternoon.
(DenverChannel) DENVER – Denver Police have identified the suspect who allegedly took hostages inside a 7-Eleven Monday. Police said 34-year-old Blas Leroux was shot in the shoulder as he tried to use one of the hostages as a human shield.
The standoff began at 8:30 a.m., after witnesses saw the suspect running from police.
“He dropped his coat,” said Dino Gallegos, who was exiting the store as Leroux ran in, “and the officer picked it up. The suspect ran around the corner and into 7-Eleven.”
Police Chief Robert White said negotiators tried for nearly an hour to get him to surrender. He refused and instead used one of the three hostages as a shield in an attempt to escape.
“The officers demanded that he let her go, at which time he attempted to pull her back into the store,” White said. “So out of fear for her safety, one of the officers fired a shot striking the individual.”
Leroux was taken to a nearby hospital with a gunshot wound to the shoulder. The hostage was not injured.
A Colorado Bureau of Investigation report shows Leroux has used several other names. He has a lengthy criminal record including convictions for trespass, motor vehicle theft, assault, burglary, child abuse, escape and harassment.

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6…SWAT TEAM SHOOTOUT

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7…Wild Police Chase – South Los Angeles, CA – April 30, 2013

Published on Apr 30, 2013

Police chase a stolen van in South Los Angeles, California. The suspect crashes into a multiple cars during the dangerous pursuit including a LAPD patrol car. The suspect jumps out and runs after spike strips disable the white cargo van.

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8…Officers Shoot & Kill Suspect on LIVE TV! Phoenix Car Chase (23 October 2014) KTVK

Published on Oct 26, 2014

**Exclusive YouTube/wwwy2000 video** | Associated Press –
Police in a Phoenix suburb fatally shot a machete-wielding man Thursday after he rammed a patrol car in a stolen truck, injuring an officer.

Avondale police said the man was shot after he refused to drop the machete and a pocket knife.

Authorities identified the man as Jeremy Bustos, 43, and said he was rushed to a hospital along with an Avondale police officer who was injured in the collision.

The officer’s name hasn’t been released, but Avondale police Sgt. Brandon Busse said the officer was in stable condition and improving at a hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Witnesses said the suspect was shot at least twice and helicopter news video showed him falling to the ground before he was taken to a trauma center.

Busse said the spree started when a man assaulted a city maintenance worker on the side of a roadway and stole his city truck about 9 a.m. The man took the truck on a joyride as police pursued before officers got a helicopter to track the stolen vehicle and backed off, authorities said.

Police began a pursuit and used tire-puncturing devices and the chase ended with the truck ramming the police car.

Officers confronted the suspect, who refused their commands and advanced toward them with a machete and pocket knife and was shot, according to Busse.

Avondale Fire Department crews extricated the police officer from his vehicle and he was airlifted to a Phoenix hospital.

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9…PCH DUI Chase Suspect Dances, Confronts Officers

Published on Apr 16, 2013

More Police Chase Videos from ABC7: http://bit.ly/15ghJHA

A DUI suspect leads CHP officers on a chase on the Pacific Coast Highway on April 16, 2013, before resisting arrest. As the chase ends on the PCH, the suspect gets out of his vehicle, dances and then walks right up to armed officers, forcing police to take action in a nail-biting scene that ends in his arrest.

10…BEST OF Police and FAIL

Published on Dec 16, 2014

Compilation : video BEST OF the best Police and epic FAIL / crash.

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11…Best COP CHASES Compilation – Police VS Street Racers – CHASES GONE WILD

Published on Mar 9, 2015

Best COP CHASES Compilation – Police VS Street Racers – CHASES GONE WILD Enjoy! 🙂
Moto Chases – Cops VS Racers Best Compilation!

Henry Sapiecha

POLICE UNIFORMS FOR WOMEN ARE AVAILABLE IN BELOW LINK SITE >>>197_banner

 

Mother demands answers after police shooting of wheelchair-bound son

US police shoot man in wheelchair

A YouTube video shows Delaware police officers shooting a man in a wheelchair on Friday. Warning: graphic content.

Wilmington:  The police shooting of a man in a wheelchair in Wilmington, in the US state of Delaware, was “unjust”, his mother said, but authorities described a different scenario, saying the man was pulling a handgun from his waist when officers shot him to death.

The shooting happened on a narrow street in Wilmington on Wednesday around 3pm. Officers responded to a 911 call of a man who had shot himself, and when they arrived, 28-year-old Jeremy McDole was “still armed with a handgun”, Police Chief Bobby Cummings said during a news conference.

McDole’s mother, Phyllis McDole, interrupted the briefing. “He was in a wheelchair, paralysed from the waist down. There’s video showing that he didn’t pull a weapon … I need answers,” she said.

Police shot dead a wheel-chair bound man - Jeremy McDole - in Wilmington, Delaware- image www.policesearch.net

Police shot dead a wheel-chair bound man – Jeremy McDole – in Wilmington, Delaware, on Wednesday, September 23. Screen Shot 2015-09-25 at 1.33.23 PM.png Photo: Image from YouTube video.

Mr Cummings said officers approached McDole and told him to put the weapon down. As McDole was removing the gun from his waist, officers “engaged him”.

“I assure you that not one of those officers intended to take anyone’s life that day,” Mr Cummings said.

Video of the shooting posted online, which the chief said appeared to be authentic, shows an officer approaching McDole with a gun drawn, shouting “show me your hands” and “drop the gun”. Other officers then appear in the video with their guns drawn, yelling similar commands.

Police shot dead a wheel-chair bound man - Jeremy McDole - in Wilmington, Delaware image www.policesearch.net

Police shot dead a wheel-chair bound man – Jeremy McDole – in Wilmington, Delaware, on Wednesday, September 23. Screen Shot 2015-09-25 at 1.33.40 PM.png Photo: Image from YouTube video.

In the video, McDole moves around in his wheelchair and reaches into his jeans, but it’s unclear what he is doing. The officers, who are not in the video at this point, fire multiple shots and McDole falls out of his wheelchair.

Mr Cummings said he was not aware of any attempt by officers to use non-lethal force before shooting McDole. He also would not say whether he thought the situation should have been handled differently. “Only our thorough investigation will reveal that,” he said.

The shooting is being investigated by the department’s criminal investigation and professional standards units, as well as the Delaware Department of Justice’s Office of Civil Rights and Public Trust, which will determine whether any officers will be charged. The state agency investigates all police shootings that result in injury or death.

Jeremy McDole in his wheelchair in Wilmington, Delaware, before he was shot www.policesearch.net

Jeremy McDole in his wheelchair in Wilmington, Delaware, before he was shot on Wednesday, September 23. Screen Shot 2015-09-25 at 1.33.57 PM.png Photo: Image from YouTube video.

Richard Smith, head of the Delaware chapter of the NAACP, called for a special prosecutor to investigate the shooting, and “to not have cops investigating cops”.

McDole’s uncle, Eugene Smith, was among a crowd of a couple dozen people who gathered on Thursday at the scene of the shooting. Mr Smith said he was with his nephew about 15 minutes before the shooting and he didn’t see a gun.

“He had a book bag, but I never seen a gun,” he said. “It was an execution. That’s what it was. I don’t care if he was black, white, whatever.”

McDole was black. The race of the four officers who fired was not released. All four are on administrative duty. One of the officers has been on the force for 15 or more years, and the others had been there for about five years, the police chief said.

Mayor Dennis Williams announced earlier this year that officers would have body cameras by the end of 2015. At the news conference, he said: “We want answers just like you want answers.”​

Late on Thursday, about 100 people gathered outside of Phyllis McDole’s home for a candlelight vigil and expressed their frustrations about the shooting.

A .40-calibre shell casing was found in the grass about 15 feet from where McDole was shot. Police said a .38-calibre gun was found by McDole’s side after he was shot.

Mr Smith said McDole had gotten out of jail about a year ago and was living in a nursing home.

McDole has an arrest record that dates back to 2005 and includes convictions for drug possession and disorderly conduct. He was also arrested for carrying a concealed deadly weapon and resisting arrest, but those charges were dropped. In November, McDole was found to have violated his probation.

McDole was paralysed when he was shot in the back in 2005 by a friend he had been walking around a neighbourhood with, smoking marijuana, according to court documents. McDole initially told police that his friend Randal Matoo shot him, but later testified that he didn’t know who shot him.

At Matoo’s bench trial, the judge said he didn’t know what happened, “but if either one of you expect me to believe that this wasn’t associated with some other wrongdoing, think again,” according to court documents. “There’s a horrible penalty that both of you, the victim, Mr McDole, and you the defendant, Mr. Matoo, are going to pay for whatever was behind this.”

Matoo was convicted of first-degree assault and possession of a firearm during a felony.

AP

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Henry Sapiecha

HAVE SIREN WILL HARRASS & COLLECT TAXES

Illustration: Michael Mucci.

Illustration: Michael Mucci.

NSW is over-policed. Taxpayers are funding a costly, inefficient and increasingly intrusive force that devotes only 21 per cent of its work hours to investigating crime. Most of the rest is soft stuff and bureaucracy. The amount of the public’s time being wasted by police is both prodigious and unacknowledged.

Without exception, every single intrusion by police, every act of harassment, every misallocation of resources, is rationalised as “public safety”. This Orwellian catch-all is used to rationalise a multitude of sins.

On average, about 16,000 people a day are enduring random intrusions by police, fined for petty offences, or fined via private tax collectors acting for profit.

I don’t even have to leave my house to sense the scale of the rising officiousness. The following incident, multiplied by a thousand times a day, is why the NSW Police are on a course to being perceived as an occupying army rather than a safety net:

On December 22, a woman double-parked outside my house to pick up a package from me. It didn’t take long, it was mid-afternoon, the street was quiet. Suddenly, a police siren wailed. A patrol car had pulled up behind her. The siren blast was manifestly unnecessary. The woman drove off and there had been no disruption to traffic. A few days later she received a Traffic Infringement Notification. She had been fined $242. She could pay or she could go to court.

She was outraged. By any measure, this was bastardry, and thus poor policing. Patrol cars are linked to the police data base, so Officer Siren would have seen that the woman had a very good driving record. He booked her anyway, for a trivial breach.

Two weeks ago it happened again. Another police siren outside my house. It was mid-morning. I went outside to see another woman being booked by another Officer Siren.

I took a photo of the car with my iPhone. The police officer called out “Can I help you, sir?”

I replied: “Do you think you’re doing the reputation of the police any good by doing this?”

“The car is double-parked. There’s nothing I can do about what people think, sir.”

I replied: “There’s everything you can do.”

Every year, NSW police stop more than five million people who have done nothing wrong. They do so politely, but most of these interventions are non-productive and cost the public tens of thousands of hours of lost time. The majority of these checks are bureaucratic make-work.

Only about 0.35 per cent of people stopped for random breath tests are charged with an offence, and most of those offences are minor.

There is a social cost to the increasing use of police and paralegals as tax collectors. As a former NSW police detective told me: “The exponential rise in revenue from Traffic Infringement Notices since the advent of privatised speed cameras has seen an escalation in people losing their licences, and their employment. Some have even lost their homes.”

On March 8, the NRMA took the unusual step of issuing a press release to complain about the way the state government was using private sub-contractors to ramp up the revenue collected from motorists via mobile speed traps: “New data shows almost 41,000 motorists have been fined by the cameras so far this financial year, up from almost 26,500 in 2013-14.”

That’s a 50 per cent surge. The NRMA urged the government to have the speed limit displayed on warning signs, “to reduce unnecessary anxiety for motorists”. It called for a fairer, safer warning system, as warnings are currently displayed only 250 metres and 50 metres before the speed camera. The NRMA wants the speed camera vehicles more clearly marked.

The major corporate operator of mobile speed cameras is Redflex. It has a contract with the NSW government and its 2014 annual report contains this ominous paragraph: “During financial year 2014, over $3.5 million was invested in the [NSW] contract which is anticipated to deliver annual revenue of more than $9 million per annum over the next two-and-a-half-year period.”

Redflex thus estimates it will harvest revenue of $23 million during the duration of its contract until 2016. Packaged as “public safety” of course.

Ever since random breath testing was introduced in 1982, there has been a steady decline in road fatalities. The annual reports of the NSW Police have cited RBT as the most effective tool in the fight to reduce fatalities. But the deterrent effect of RBT plateaued years ago. The continued downward trend in fatalities in the past decade has come more from the introduction of air bags and improvements in auto technology.

Police could achieve broadly the same impact with RBT with half the rate of stoppages, half the cost, and half the social disruption. Instead, the police and the government are going in the opposite direction, with more intrusions.

Compounding this policy malfunction is the rip-off of motorists at the federal level. Over the past 15 years, the federal government has extracted $136 billion in fuel excises from vehicle-owners, yet spent $53 billion on road infrastructure. The disparity is $83 billion. Vehicle owners are thus being milked by government in addition to the impositions imposed by the states.

Then there is local government, where inner-city councils deploy swarms of tax collectors they call “rangers”. No bureaucratic euphemism can disguise the grim pettiness attached to the term “parking inspector”. They seem to live in my street.

At every level of government – federal, state, local – vehicle-owners are being used as cash cows by government, in a disingenuous and increasingly intrusive way. And I don’t even own a car.

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Henry Sapiecha

Police defend speeding policy in fining people for minor speed infringements

Police have defended their focus on low-level speeding radar gun use image www.policesearch.net

Police have defended their focus on low-level speeding

New South Wales and Victoria police have hit back at claims by Mazda Australia boss Martin Benders that the focus on speeding has created a nation of distracted drivers.

Speaking at a press event in Japan this week Benders said he believes Australian drivers have become too focused on not speeding at the detriment of driving standards.

Benders, who spent six years working in Mazda’s operations in Japan and Europe, believes that the Australian law enforcement’s decision to focus so heavily on low-level speeding has contributed to a significant drop in driving standards.

“I have to say, having been away six years, I’m amazed how bad the driving has gotten in Australia in terms of a focus on not going 1km/h over – it’s just shocking,” Benders said at a press conference in Japan. “And yet we’ve got the police standing up saying ‘we can’t have distracted drivers’ – we’ve got nothing but distracted drivers. They are so focused on whether they are 1km/h out on the speed limit or not, it’s shocking. It is a real problem in Australia.”

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Masashi Otskua, project leader on the CX-5 and CX-9 SUVs, said he was surprised by the strict nature of Australian police about speeding during his fact-finding visits here.

“Before I went to Australia I thought Australians would be very tolerant,” Otsuka said. “That was not the case.”

But police in both NSW and Victoria are adamant that their focus on speeding is necessary to cut the road toll.

“Speed is a major killer on our roads,” Victorian Roads Policing Superintendent Neville Taylor told Fairfax Media.

“Research shows that you are more likely to collide with another car, hit a pedestrian or run off the road if you exceed the speed limit.

“This is why maximum speed limits exist and police will be enforcing them. If you are travelling above the posted speed limit, you can expect to be stopped by police.

“You may not think that a few kilometres extra will make a big difference but research shows that it does. We are trying to change the culture and make all speeding socially unacceptable, the way we did with drink driving and not wearing seatbelts.”

New South Wales police directed Fairfax to recent road safety data from Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics that showed a 25 per cent drop in road deaths between 2004 and 2013.

Henry Sapiecha