16 people go missing every day in Queensland Australia

Queensland’s dedicated Missing Persons Unit has the job of solving the mystery of more than 300 missing persons. Some have been missing for decades and some only months

THEY are the faces of everyday people – your neighbour, an old friend, somebody who you might have gone to school with.

They are someone’s son or daughter. They could have been somebody’s mum or dad.

What they all have in common is that they belong to a unique collection of people in our state – a group of more than 300 long-term missing persons.

Some of these faces have not been seen for decades. For others, it has only been a matter of months since they were reported missing.

Police hold concerns for the safety and welfare of all of these people – as is the case for every missing person.

The task to track them down, to solve the mystery of their disappearance, falls into the hands of Queensland’s dedicated Missing Persons Unit.

The man in charge is Detective Senior Sergeant Damien Powell, a police officer with more than 30 years experience and who has led the unit for eight years. He says there have been some memorable cases, but it would be “unfair” to single one out.

“Because each year there’s about 20 missing persons … that we can’t locate and that’s 20 families who are desperate for answers,” he says.

“I just feel it does them an injustice to focus on one particular case.”

This specialist unit is unique in its operation as it’s the only Missing Persons Unit in the country to offer assistance seven days a week, typically from 7am to 10pm.

They deal with more than 6000 cases every year – about 16 every day – and more than 60 per cent involve children under the age of 16.

“They’re (the children) a large chunk of our business,” Sen-Sgt Powell says.

“Typically, the reason (children under 12) go missing is they have a fight with a sibling, or they do a chore, or they’re forgetful.

“They’re a high risk simply because crossing the road is a danger to them.”

Sen-Sgt Powell says risk assessment is crucial to what his unit does, gauging the potential danger every missing person could be exposed to.

“Obviously some missing persons are low risk, others are high risk,” he says.

“Our office is very focused on risk assessment and ensuring that the service response is appropriate for those missing persons.

“Each and every time somebody goes missing, we assess the risk for that individual occasion because it could be different to the previous time.”

For missing children, this risk assessment can be extended to the consideration of a potential abduction – something Sen-Sgt Powell says is fortunately a rare occurrence in Queensland.

The three main reasons adults go missing, Sen-Sgt Powell says, are health issues, financial pressures and relationship breakdowns.

“A missing person is any person whose whereabouts are unknown and there’s concerns for their safety or wellbeing,” he says. “So, a simple loss of contact doesn’t constitute a missing person.”

The number of people reported missing has been rising steadily over the past 18 months, Sen-Sgt Powell says.

He says the increase is largely due to publicity, but he also points to the potential impact of technology.

“Interestingly, the digital age and mobile phones have heightened people’s sensitivity to not getting hold of someone,” he says.

“Pre-digital age, if you didn’t hear from someone for 24 hours, then it wasn’t an issue because mobile phones didn’t exist.

“Now, people start to become concerned when the mobile phone is not answered because everybody’s got one and everybody’s got one on them …”

The group of people who are reported missing the least are aged 17 to 25 – an age group Sen-Sgt Powell says are more likely to be digitally connected.

“They’re fresh out of school, so they’ve got a lot of friends from school,” he says. “They’re in university or they’re in employment.

“They’re still connected with a circle of friends and we see this disassociation developing in later life.”

Sen-Sgt Powell says it is still important for people to report a person missing as soon as they have concerns for their safety or welfare.

“If it’s under suspicious circumstances, then people’s memory is going to be better the sooner you talk to them,” he says.

“Our access to data and CCTV is going to be better the sooner you report them missing and our chances of recovering them alive are obviously greater.

“We’d rather know sooner than later if there’s concerns for the safety and welfare.”

When it comes to Crime Stoppers’ role with missing persons, Queensland chief executive Trevor O’Hara says the community always responds in “great numbers” when an alert is issued.

“There’s always a great community outpouring of information once someone goes missing,” he says.

“We’re actually getting pieces of information which at the time may seem irrelevant, but they help to build an amazing timeline about things.”

Mr O’Hara says missing children also generate plenty of calls from the community.

“If anything involves kids, we get calls here at Crime Stoppers, the police at Policelink get calls, triple-zero get calls,” he says.

“There’s a real sense of community support around young people especially.

“We actually get a response almost like children when it comes to seniors.”

As well as fielding calls from the community, Mr O’Hara says that Crime Stoppers has also received calls from those who were reported missing.

“We have also taken calls from missing persons themselves and the beauty of that is it is anonymous,” he says. “They’re ringing from somewhere in the country to tell us that they’re OK and obviously we do our best to get that message through to the right person.”

Mr O’Hara says the caller must provide “unique information” to verify their identity.

There are currently more than 300 people on Queensland’s list of long-term missing persons.

One of those is Kathleen O’Shea, a mother of five from Melbourne who visited the state’s far north in December 2005 ahead of the birth of her first grandchild.

On December 29, her son Alan drove Ms O’Shea to a street in Atherton to drop her off.

She told him she was off to play pool at the Atherton Hotel and afterwards she would visit friends in Mareeba.

According to a the findings of a coronial inquest handed down in 2014, Ms O’Shea visited a bottle shop that night at the Atherton Hotel, and left in the company of two men.

That was the last time the 44-year-old was seen.

A coroner ruled in 2014 that Ms O’Shea had died.

Although the cause of her death could not be determined, it was “most likely that an unknown person or persons with whom she came into contact either at the Atherton Hotel or soon after she left there, caused her death and disposed of her body”.

Ms O’Shea’s now 30-year-old daughter, Lily Parmenter, says she had a feeling something was wrong when her mum first disappeared.

“It wasn’t like her to leave and not give any warning as to her whereabouts,” she says.

“We spoke the day before … and she seemed fine.”

Ms Parmenter, who describes her mum as “funny” and “loving”, believes Ms O’Shea was taken by someone.

“I don’t know who and I don’t know why,” she says. “I think that someone did take her and the thing that kills me the most is the fact we haven’t found a body.

“I want to be able to bury my mum with a bit of dignity. It kills me to think what her final moments could have been. It’s been the source of nightmares for me.”

Ms Parmenter says she hopes there is someone who knows what happened to her mum and would be willing to speak out. “If they’re protecting someone, they shouldn’t be protecting anyone.”

“They should be trying to help five kids trying to get some closure. Nothing is too small in terms of details,” she says.

Police have no new information on Ms O’Shea’s disappearance.

Sen-Sgt Powell says police are also appealing for details to track down 63-year-old Toowoomba woman Barbara Troughton who went missing in January last year.

“(She) was operating a small grocery store in Toowoomba and one morning left a note for her partner that she’d had enough,” he says.

“We believe Barbara’s still alive and well, but where she is, we have no idea.”

And each missing person’s disappearance has a major effect on the many people in their lives.

“Australian research has shown that for every missing person there’s 12 people directly affected. It has a significant impact on the community,” Sen-Sgt Powell says.

If you or someone you know needs support, contact Lifeline, call 13 11 14

MISSING PERSONS SITE HERE QLD POLICE

The National Missing Persons Unit Web Site
http://www.missingpersons.gov.au/

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Henry Sapiecha

Ford Is Making Hybrid Police Cruisers Now as well

Ford Motor Co., which sells more police vehicles in the U.S. than any other automaker, says it will offer a police pursuit version of the hybrid Fusion midsize sedan, in response to requests from cities nationwide.

The next time the cops chase you down for speeding, they could be driving a fuel-efficient gas-electric hybrid.

Ford Motor Co., which sells more police vehicles in the U.S. than any other automaker, says it will offer a police pursuit version of the hybrid Fusion midsize sedan, in response to requests from cities nationwide. The new car, with its 2-Liter four-cylinder engine and 1.4 kilowatt lithium-ion battery, is expected to get 38 miles per gallon of gas in combined city-highway driving. That’s 20 mpg more than Ford’s current police car, the Taurus police interceptor.

The hybrids won’t be as fast as the Taurus with a 3.7-Liter turbocharged V6, but Ford expects it to be quick enough to earn a pursuit rating when tested later this year by the Michigan State Police and Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, the first hybrid to earn that honor. To get a pursuit rating, cars have to perform well in acceleration, handling, braking, top speed and ergonomics and make the list of cars that the Michigan and Los Angeles agencies would buy.

When the throttle is held down for five seconds, the car will go into pursuit mode, using both the electric motor and the gas engine for maximum performance, Ford said. The company also says the car will be durable for tough police duties.

Police cars spend much of their days idling by the side of a road, and that’s where the hybrid has a true advantage, Ford said. The gas engine will shut off at idle with the battery handling the electrical load for flashers, radios and other items. It will restart to recharge the battery.

Ford said at $2.50 per gallon for gas, the hybrid would save a police department $3,877 per year in fuel costs per vehicle. The price of the hybrid, available in the summer of 2018, isn’t being released just yet.

Ford was to unveil the police car Monday with press conferences in New York and Los Angeles. One already has been outfitted to look like a Los Angeles police cruiser.

While big-city departments might be most interested in the fuel savings, the cars might also be appealing to small departments.

Thomas Korabik, chief of the 10-officer North Muskegon, Michigan, Police Department, said his city spends about $22,000 per year on gasoline for four cruisers and would be interested in cutting that in half.

But he wonders if the Fusion is big enough inside to carry computers, radios and other equipment. Many departments have switched to SUVs to handle the equipment, said Korabik, who also is president of the Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police.

“Anytime you can save money it is good,” he said. “I’d want to see the car first and see how it would hold up.”

Todd Soderquist, Ford’s chief engineer for the Fusion Police Responder, conceded the car is smaller than other cruisers on the outside. “Internally, you’ll be surprised at how comparable they are,” he said.

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Henry Sapiecha

Know your rights when pulled over by police?AUSTRALIA

police-search-advice image www.policesearch.net

The flashing red-and-blues of a police car in the rear-view mirror have the unique effect of making even the most innocent of drivers feel like Pablo Escobar with a boot packed to overflowing with white powder.

But that sinking feeling is magnified a thousand times over when it’s blended with the crushing realisation that you have, in fact, committed an offence worthy of the constabulary’s attention. Your once clear mind becomes a swirling mix of harried excuses and accidental admissions of guilt as, dreading the worst, your sweaty hands shakily hand over your licence.

And while we would never advocate committing an offence behind the wheel of a car, or make excuses for those who do, we equally realise that mistakes can happen, and it’s important to know your rights when pulled over by police, whether you’ve done something wrong or not.

The below advice is a general summary, but it’s important to be across the specific legislation in your state or territory. The police pull-over procedure, and your specific rights and obligations, can vary, and it’s always a good idea to seek professional advice, should you ever need it.

Since the introduction of the random breath test, a police officer can pull you over anytime they’ like.

“Every state has its own legislation and obligations, so it is important to investigate the specifics pertinent to where you live,” says Andrew Tiedt, a partner at Armstrong Legal in Sydney.

“But remember, there’s nothing wrong with saying to the police, “Do I have to let you do this?”. If they say, “Can I search your car?” there’s nothing wrong with asking if you can refuse their request.

“Finally, don’t answer questions you don’t have to answer. There’s nothing you can say in that moment that will improve your chances in a later court hearing. You can only harm them. So go home, think it over, seek professional advice and then figure out the best approach from there.”

The below answers some of the most common questions surrounding your rights and the police in Australia.

When can you be pulled over?

There was once a time when, in order to be stopped by police, there needed to be a reason – or, to use legal parlance, you’d need to have given them probable cause (be it speeding, driving erratically or doing something illegal) – for a police officer to stop you. So, if you were to scream past a police car with a radar gun, cross double white lines or were spotted not wearing a seatbelt, using a phone or looking generally suspicious, you could be stopped.

But since the introduction of the random breath test, a police officer can pull you over anytime they’d like to administer the breath alcohol exam, and that means you no longer need to have done anything wrong before being stopped.

What are my rights if I’m stopped?

First things first, you don’t need to answer any questions, nor provide any personal information, other than your name and address. You are also required by law to hand over your driver’s licence so police can check you’re telling them the truth. So, what happens if you get pulled over without a license? Driving without your licence can be an offence, and can cost you cash.

While you don’t have to volunteer information, it’s always a judgement call as to whether you want to aggravate the situation by not answering menial and non-incriminating questions, especially if you’ve done nothing wrong. The same goes for those wondering if they can video police in Australia during a traffic stop. While not illegal to film your interaction with police, it’s also likely to inflame the situation, so a judgement call will be required.

If you don’t pull over when asked, however, things take a far more serious turn. In NSW, for example, a new law known as Skye’s Law (named for a toddler killed by a car evading a police stop) includes stiff penalties, including up to three years in prison for the first offence, five years if you have been convicted of a major offence in the preceding five years, as well as a lengthy driving disqualification.

What are my rights when pulled over by police?

The flashing red-and-blues of a police car in the rear-view mirror have the unique effect of making even the most innocent of drivers feel like Pablo Escobar with a boot packed to overflowing with white powder.

But that sinking feeling is magnified a thousand times over when it’s blended with the crushing realisation that you have, in fact, committed an offence worthy of the constabulary’s attention. Your once clear mind becomes a swirling mix of harried excuses and accidental admissions of guilt as, dreading the worst, your sweaty hands shakily hand over your licence.

And while we would never advocate committing an offence behind the wheel of a car, or make excuses for those who do, we equally realise that mistakes can happen, and it’s important to know your rights when pulled over by police, whether you’ve done something wrong or not.

The below advice is a general summary, but it’s important to be across the specific legislation in your state or territory. The police pull-over procedure, and your specific rights and obligations, can vary, and it’s always a good idea to seek professional advice, should you ever need it.

Since the introduction of the random breath test, a police officer can pull you over anytime they like.

POLICE-PULLING-OVER-MOTORISTS IMAGE www.policesearch.net

“Every state has its own legislation and obligations, so it is important to investigate the specifics pertinent to where you live,” says Andrew Tiedt, a partner at Armstrong Legal in Sydney.

“But remember, there’s nothing wrong with saying to the police, “Do I have to let you do this?”. If they say, “Can I search your car?” there’s nothing wrong with asking if you can refuse their request.

“Finally, don’t answer questions you don’t have to answer. There’s nothing you can say in that moment that will improve your chances in a later court hearing. You can only harm them. So go home, think it over, seek professional advice and then figure out the best approach from there.”

The below answers some of the most common questions surrounding your rights and the police in Australia.

When can you be pulled over?

There was once a time when, in order to be stopped by police, there needed to be a reason – or, to use legal parlance, you’d need to have given them probable cause (be it speeding, driving erratically or doing something illegal) – for a police officer to stop you. So, if you were to scream past a police car with a radar gun, cross double white lines or were spotted not wearing a seatbelt, using a phone or looking generally suspicious, you could be stopped.

But since the introduction of the random breath test, a police officer can pull you over anytime they’d like to administer the breath alcohol exam, and that means you no longer need to have done anything wrong before being stopped.

What are my rights if I’m stopped?

First things first, you don’t need to answer any questions, nor provide any personal information, other than your name and address. You are also required by law to hand over your driver’s licence so police can check you’re telling them the truth. So, what happens if you get pulled over without a license? Driving without your licence can be an offence, and can cost you cash.

While you don’t have to volunteer information, it’s always a judgement call as to whether you want to aggravate the situation by not answering menial and non-incriminating questions, especially if you’ve done nothing wrong. The same goes for those wondering if they can video police in Australia during a traffic stop. While not illegal to film your interaction with police, it’s also likely to inflame the situation, so a judgement call will be required.

If you don’t pull over when asked, however, things take a far more serious turn. In NSW, for example, a new law known as Skye’s Law (named for a toddler killed by a car evading a police stop) includes stiff penalties, including up to three years in prison for the first offence, five years if you have been convicted of a major offence in the preceding five years, as well as a lengthy driving disqualification.

What do police check when I’m pulled over?

That nerve-wracking wait when a police officer takes your licence back to their vehicle is down to the fact that almost every traffic stop includes a check on your name and vehicle to ensure there’s no outstanding court or enforcement orders against you.

Hopefully, and mostly, there isn’t, and the officer will simply hand your licence back to you.

Can police search my car in Australia?

Once stopped, police only need to ‘reasonably suspect’ illegal activity to search your vehicle. And the term ‘reasonable’ is incredibly vague, from the driver talking quickly or even just appearing nervous, which is just about every person ever stopped by the police.

What to do if you are pulled over for a DUI test?

As mentioned above, the police can pull you over at absolutely at any moment – and without you having done anything to warrant the attention – to administer a random breath test.

It’s actually a two-, and sometimes three-stage process, and failing the roadside examination doesn’t always mean you’ll be charged with an offence. The mobile device used during a road stop in some states (the one in which you’re asked to count to 10, rather than blow into a straw) is actually only capable of measuring whether alcohol is present on your breath.

If a driver fails that ‘screening’ test, the traditional breathalyser is produced to take an official roadside reading. But if you fail, even that test won’t be produced in court, instead you’ll be arrested and taken to the closest police station (or to the command bus) where you’ll be tested a third time, the results of which will be used as evidence.

But don’t think a trip to the police station will always work in your favour. While it’s true that the only thing that can lower your blood-alcohol content is time, it’s also true that the amount of alcohol present in your blood actually increases in the period immediately after you’ve stopped drinking before it then starts to decrease, so the results of the station test could actually be worse than the roadside one.

Refuse a breath test at the side of the road, and you’ll be immediately taken to the station for an official test. Refuse that, and you’ll be charged and face heavy penalties – often worse than those for high-range drink driving.

What are my rights when I’m pulled over for speeding?

A stop for a suspicion of speeding changes your rights exactly not at all, with you still only obligated to confirm your name and home address.

And its here where you should be particularly cautious with what bonus information you offer the police. If you’re sprung by a fixed camera or radar gun, your chances of defending it in court are minimal. But in NSW, for example, police can still book you on what’s called a speed ‘estimate.’ That means the police just have to think you were speeding, and don’t need to provide any proof.

It’s these speed estimates that are the most defendable in court, but your chances of clearing a ticket plummet if you are recorded confirming you were speeding when asked by the officer.

But most important of all, and with all matters of the law, if in doubt, seek professional advice.

Ever been pulled over by the police? Tell us about your experiences HERE

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Henry Sapiecha

 

Russians Are Using YouTube To Report Police Brutality

Police detain a protester during an opposition rally in central Moscow December 12, 2010. Hundreds of opposition protesters gathered for a rally called "For Russia without Putin" in Moscow's Pushkin Square on Sunday.  REUTERS/Nikolai Korchekov (RUSSIA - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST IMAGES OF THE DAY) - RTXVNU3

Police detain a protester during an opposition rally in central Moscow December 12, 2010. Hundreds of opposition protesters gathered for a rally called “For Russia without Putin” in Moscow’s Pushkin Square on Sunday.

Russians are learning that often, filming police does get results


Ordinary Russians are adopting a tactic to combat police brutality that’s become common in the United States: YouTube.

Police brutality in Russia has been a public issue for several years, with near-daily reports of beatings, shootings, and deaths in police stations occurring throughout the country. The problem became so bad that in 2010, then-president Dmitry Medvedev ordered an overhaul of the police and security services. The problem does not appear to have subsided, as data provided by Russia’s Ministry of Internal Affairs and news reports shows that in 2016, 99 people died inside Russian police stations. However, Maria Berezina, the journalist who compiled the data, claims that this number likely only represents a fraction of the number of deaths.

Occasionally filming police does bring results. In January, Russian police officers were filmed as they violently pulled a man with a prosthetic arm out of his car, breaking the arm in the process. About a month later, police officials opened an investigation into the officers involved after the video caused an uproar on social media.

A Vocativ analysis of Russian video uploads to YouTube found that 47 percent of Russian videos detailing police brutality posted in the last year had only been uploaded in the last 30 days. A search for the Russian terms for police brutality (Полицейский беспредел and полицейский произвол) revealed 19,450 videos uploaded in the past year. Of these, 9,232 were uploaded in the last month alone.

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The videos showing police brutality in Russia are often uploaded by anonymous and ordinary users of the site. One example, uploaded by an anonymous user claiming to live in the provincial city of Tolyatti, claims that police twisted his arms, forced him to accompany them to the police station, and refused to provide medical aid, even though he was actually the victim of a crime. According to the user, he has since been released and was hospitalized for his injuries. He is now demanding an apology from the police.

People are not afraid to upload footage of even minor incidents involving the police. One anonymous YouTube user showed police appearing to assault the user as he filmed officers placing handcuffs on a drunk man in the hospital. Police shouted and used force to attempt to stop the user from filming.

A video uploaded by Russian civic activists instructs viewers on how to interact with police officers during what they deem illegitimate stops. Such incidents appear to be common on the streets of Russia. The activists have uploaded dozens of videos showing interactions with the police.

Lev Ponomarev, a Russian human rights activist, says that “the crime rate in the police and prison system, we can say, has gradually increased in recent years.” He believes “the police system is falling apart, as well as the investigative committee, and Prosecutor’s Office. The cause of all this is corruption. Corruption scandals are occurring everywhere. If this happens within the senior offices, and we know that it is happening from the news, it trickles down to the regular policeman, and is becoming more visible and thriving.”

“They need to be held accountable,” Ponomarev said. “They take innocent people and beat them to get a testimony. And we have a lot of complaints about it from citizens.”

“With the advent of the internet comes more publicity and transparency. People are more involved in the discussion of social problems via the internet,” he added.

Lev Ponomarev said he is also focused on the issue of torture in Russian prisons, and works to assist abused prisoners. His movement for Humans Rights continues to receive complaints while helping victims of police brutality.

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Henry Sapiecha

San Antonio Police Department shooting of officer

On Sunday, November 20, 2016 a San Antonio Police Officer was murdered in front of the San Antonio Police Department’s Headquarters. The vehicle pictured was seen fleeing the scene. The suspect is described as a black male wearing a hoodie, baggie pants and possible facial hair.

Anyone with information is asked to contact CRIME STOPPERS at 224-STOP (224-7867).

CRIME STOPPERS will pay UP TO $10,000 for information which leads to the arrest of the suspect(s) responsible for the Capital Murder. As always you do not have to give your name when you call.

San Antonio Police Department's photo.
San Antonio Police Department's photo.San Antonio Police Department's photo.
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Streets were blocked off with police tape as officials investigated the slaying.

The shooting came less than five months after a gunman killed five officers in Dallas who were working a protest about the fatal police shootings of black skin men in Minnesota and Louisiana. It was the deadliest day for American law enforcement since September 11, 2001.

Ten days after the Dallas attack, a man wearing a ski mask and armed with two rifles and a pistol killed three officers near a gas station and convenience store in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. And earlier this month, two Des Moines, Iowa-area police officers were fatally shot in separate ambush-style attacks while sitting in their patrol cars.

Marconi’s Twitter account shows solidarity for the five slain Dallas officers by posting a photo of a “Pray for Dallas” shirt under a headline that read “San Antonio stands with Dallas.”

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Henry Sapiecha

Man arrested after a policeman was shot dead writing out a ticket in his squad car

A POLICE officer writing out a traffic ticket to a motorist was shot to death in his squad car by another driver who pulled up from behind, authorities said.

Detective Benjamin Marconi, who had two adult children, had expressed support for the slain Dallas police officers image www.policesearch.netTwenty-year police veteran Detective Benjamin Marconi, was shot twice in the head. Picture San Antonio Police Departmentimage www.policesearch.net

San Antonio Police Department Chief William McManus identified the officer as Detective Benjamin Marconi, 50, a 20-year veteran of the force in Texas.

He said he doesn’t believe the suspect has any relationship to the original motorist who was pulled over, and no motive has been identified.

“We consider this suspect to be extremely dangerous and a clear threat to law enforcement officers and the public,” said McManus, who added that after the shooting officers had been instructed to not make traffic stops alone.

Later, the US Marshals Service confirmed a person of interest in the killing was being questioned by police. Chris Bozeman of the Marshals Service refused to reveal the name of the detainee or his connection to the crime.

McManus said Marconi had pulled over a vehicle and while he was inside his squad car writing a ticket, a car pulled up behind him. The driver of that car got out, walked up to the officer’s driver-side window and shot Marconi twice in the head, then walked back to his car and drove away.

Marconi was pronounced dead at a hospital.

McManus said investigators are looking into all leads and motives, including whether it could be related to an officer-involved shooting earlier in the city. In that incident, McManus said, police fatally shot a man who pointed a gun at officers outside an apartment following a seven-hour standoff.

The San Antonio Police Department is asking for assistance in identifying the person pictured. He might have information on the murder of the San Antonio Police Officer.
http://www.katc.com/…/san-antonio-police-officer-fatally-sh…

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Henry Sapiecha

Phone Surveillance by the FBI & Police is in place already

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Your local police may use a controversial piece of technology—ominously dubbed a stingray—to track your phone. But, the FBI is taking pains to make sure you never find out. The agency encourages police to find additional evidence so that stingray technology never comes up in court, according to a new memo.

It’s no secret that law enforcement agencies scattered around the country use such devices—known as IMSCI catchers, or colloquially “stingrays”—which mimic cellphone towers and collect data, like phone numbers and location, from everyone in their vicinity. But that’s not because the FBI isn’t trying to hide that fact. The agency is so keen on keeping the devices from the public that it asks local police departments to sign nondisclosure agreements about their stingrays—leading to some cops trying withdrawing cases that rely on stingrays for evidence.>>>>>…MORE HERE >>>>www.intelagencies.com

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Henry Sapiecha

36 Police Women From Across many nations/countries

Policing is one of the toughest jobs anywhere in the world with long hours, dangerous shifts and acting as the last line of protection between the general public and tyranny a lot of the time. Despite its perils, this job is held in high regard wherever you are in the world and is done by those willing to put themselves out there on the streets. However, even in this progressive day and age, there are very few women in Police forces (generally speaking) and so in this gallery, we celebrate those who have taken up the cause in whatever country they happen to be in.

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1. Austria

AUSTRIAN-POLICE-WOMEN image www.policesearch.net

Ranked as one of the best police forces in the world in one of the most peaceful countries in the world, the Austrian Police force, as it is now, was only formed in 2005 by merging the Gendarmerie and the Polizei into the federal Police Force. With about 12% women within the force, the Austrian police force has a relatively high female presence compared to many other countries and even has all female task forces in certain cities.

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2. Poland

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15% of the Polish Policja are female and in 2015, the country nominated its first female chief of Police. Women have been allowed into the Polish police force since 1925, a centralized force that operates within the 17 municipal regions of the country.

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3. Iraq

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In a country of strict religious grounding, women have not always been allowed into the police force and even when they were, only lower rank positions were available to them, however, since 2009, this has changed and the first class of women advanced through elite officer training. A highly dangerous job in a country where insurgents often target figures of authority, it also one of the most highly paid.

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4. Japan

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Only around 7.7% of Japan’s police force are women and most are mainly on low-profile assignments such as traffic control. Up until the early 1990’s female officers were not armed, had to wear skirts instead of slacks, and were assigned to ‘less hazardous’ duties like traffic control, juvenile counseling, and office duties but this has slowly begun to change over time. It was only in 2009 that female officers were put on full time ‘koban’ duties or beat patrol.

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5. Iran

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In 2003, some 400 women were employed by Iranian law enforcement as the first female officers since the 1979 revolution and although some still remain within the ranks of the police force, they do not currently recruit female officers due to strict religious concerns.

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6. Malaysia

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Women have been a feature in the Malaysian police force since 1948 when they were employed to stop food supplies falling into the hands of communist terrorists and were needed to help check women for smuggling operations. In 1955 the  first intake of seven women’s with the rank of Women Police Inspector was undertaken, when the Policewoman unit was officially organized, and a year later 56 female police constables were employed.

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7. The Netherlands

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Nochtli Peralta Alvarez is a former police officer in The Netherlands turned Instagram model and athlete who you can follow at instagram.com/nochtlii. Still working as on officer when she turned her hand to modeling, she would regularly get recognized on the street. The Dutch Police Corps is split into 25 regional units and employs around 50,000 people in the country with officers regularly on patrol.

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8. Singapore

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Increasing steadily over the past decade, around 18% of the Singapore police force is now female with an estimated 8,800 uniformed officers, an increase from 14% in 2003. The Women Special Constabulary was first formed in 1949 as a voluntary unit and in 1990, women were allowed part-time positions on traffic patrol and by 2007, a Special Women’s Task Team comprising 23 female officers was formed.

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9. Peru

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Women were first recruited into the Peruvian National Police in 1992 were roles mainly consisted of traffic duties. Now, approximately 11% of the police force are female and greater efforts to employ more throughout the country have been put in place in an attempt to stamp out corruption.

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10. Pakistan

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Women make up only a tiny fraction of Pakistan’s overall police force at around just 0.89%. However, concerted efforts have been made to encourage more women to sign up as it has been found that it can go to greater lengths in helping combatting extremism and terrorism within the country with the US embassy also offering training.

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11. Israel

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With a makeup of around 16% women, the Israeli police force is a centralized force operating out of Jerusalem without any municipal departments. With around 35,000 persons on the payroll. There are also 70,000 Civil Guard volunteers who contribute time to assist officers in their own communities.

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12. England

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The women’s police force in England was first founded in 1914 and staffed by volunteers but a year later, the first female officer with the full powers of arrest was in employ. Around 27.3% of the police force in England and Wales are female.

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13. Chile

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In 1962, the Chilean police force was amongst the first uniformed services within the country to allow women into its ranks. Known as the Carabineros de Chile, the force was formed in 1927 and has jurisdiction over the whole country.

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14. China

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Gaining much attention on social media, this police officer in China’s Anyue County is said to be so beautiful and charming that she can persuade anyone. Often tasked with tackling illegal street vendors, she apparently has such a charming demeanor and smile that vendors do her bidding without arrest or confrontation.

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15. Dominican Republic

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The Dominican Republic National Police and has a separate division of tourism police that can be seen in certain parts of the country. A general police training school was established in 1966 in Dominica and women have been encouraged to join the police force due to the amount of violence directed towards women in the country.

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16. India

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The first woman to joins the Indian Police Service was in 1972 and since then the number has increased dramatically to around 105,000 which is about 6% of the overall force. Now, with over 400 all women police stations in India, a 2004 study found that this led to a 23% increase in reporting of violence against women and children, as well as a higher conviction rate.

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17. Jordan 

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Jordan was the first Arab country to employ policewomen within its law enforcement in 1972 when they primarily used in the police laboratory, in budgeting and accounting, public relations, licensing, and in prison operations. However, operations and patrolling opportunities have become increased and far more frequent since then and they are now also visible on border security.

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18. Norway

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31% of Norway’s police force are women with the aim of making the number 40% very soon, it seems more than likely that half of the police force will be female in the next few years. Dating back to the 13th century, the Norwegian police force is relatively small with around 13,000 employees of which 8,000 are officers.

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19. South Korea 

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Headlines were set ablaze in South Korea and internationally when former Maxim model Kim Miso announced she was to join the Korean police force. Miss Miso was a Miss Maxim Korea 2014 contestant before joining the police force in the capital of South Korea, Seoul.

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20. Russia

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The Russian police force was thrust into the headlines when one of its cadets went on to become Miss St Petersburg. A young, Oxana Federova then went on to become  Miss Kalokagathia 1999, Miss Fitness, Miss Fortune, and Miss Russia 2001 but declined the opportunity to go to Miss Universe that year in order to carry on in her studies. In 2002, Oxana then went on to win Miss Universe and then went on to be named the most beautiful miss Universe ever in 2011. After her Miss Universe stint came to an end Oxana went on to get a Ph.D. and then returned to the police force going on to be being promoted to Captain in September 2002 and Major in 2005.

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21. Philippines

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Sofia Loren Deliu is a police officer in the Philippines and also a Miss Philippines Earth Contestant in 2015. A beauty pageant contestant before she joined the Philippines National Police force, in sich contests as Miss Teen Philippines 2006 and Miss Baguio 2008, Ms. Deliu continued to enter into pageants after her successful enrollment into the police force and even received support from the country’s leaders. She is now part of the security detail for President Rodrigo Duerte.

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22. Yemen

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The first corps of policewomen in Yemen was employed in 1999 and today, some 2,000 women serve in Yemen’s internal security forces. However, numbers are steadily decreasing as the profession is widely seen as male orientated and parents are reluctant to let their children sign up.

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23. Sweden

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Women make up 40% of the overall staff of the Swedish police force and 28% of the officers, and the number is ever increasing with the first group of female police officers being employed in 1908. It wasn’t however, until 1957 that the possibility of becoming a Police Constable on patrol duty was made available to women.

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24. Taiwan

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Earlier this year, a young recruit into the Taiwan police force took the internet by storm for her good looks as pictures of her in her uniform were shared on social media. 23-year-old Huang Yichun graduated from the Taipei Police Academy in 2013 and now works for the Governmental Police Squad of New Taipei City in Taiwan.

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25. U.S.A

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The was the first American-born female police officer in the United States, was hired in 1910 but it took another six decades for numbers to really increase as, by 1970, only two percent of all police were women. The 90s saw this number begin to take off and in 1991, 9% of the force was female.

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26. Nicaragua

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Women make up almost 30 % of Nicaragua’s police force and the chief of police is also a woman. One of the highest ratios of policewomen in the force in the world, It began with the Sandinista revolution of 1979 which saw many women become guerrillas and fight on equal footing with men. When the Sandinista’s won the country, the perception of women in roles of authority had changed and more and more moved into law enforcement.

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27. North Korea

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Little is known about the set-up of most of North Korea’s security forces but women are predominantly seen in policing as traffic cops with one being awarded the country’s top honor in 2013 for an unspecified “heroic feat” leading some to speculate that she may have rescued the country’s supreme leader from a traffic accident.

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28. Lithuania

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With around 30.5% women in the police staff of Lithuania, it has a very high number of female staff members compared to other forces around the world.

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29. Indonesia

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Made up of 400,000 police officers, there are currently 13,000 female police officers in the Indonesian National Police, which is a branch of the country’s armed forces. In 2014 the country came under fire by the human rights watch for subjecting female applicants to the role to a virginity test. Despite complaints that this is invasive and derogatory, the practice is still believed to be in place.

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30. Italy

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There are three kinds of police in Italy, the Polizia, who deal with local policing issues, the Vigili, who are town police dealing mostly with road traffic infringements, and the Carabinieri who are the military police. Until 1999 it was not possible for women to join the latter of these police forces and in 2007, the Polizia made headlines when it issued ‘official’ stilettos to its 14,750 female officers to give their uniform a “younger, sexier look.”

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31. Germany

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A senior police commissioner in Germany was bombarded by messages from adoring fans when her Instagram photos went viral. Adrienne Koleszar  competed in the bikini class of the Bodybuilding-WM in 2015 and has gained a lot of recognition online with some fans even going so far as to be begged to be arrested.

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32. Canada

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Rose Fortune was Canada’s first female police officer in the 19th century but it wasn’t until 1912 that women were ‘officially’ allowed to become police officers. Women officers account for 20.8% of the Canadian officers in the police force.

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33. Iceland

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There is no military or armed forces in Iceland so all law enforcement falls under the jurisdiction of the Icelandic Police force except for that of Icelandic waters which are patrolled by the Icelandic coastguard. There are around 653 police officers in total in the country, 95 of which are women. With the first and only ever shooting death in the country from a police operation happening in 2013, Iceland consistently ranks as the safest police force.

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34. Turkey

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There is an ongoing gender equality struggle in Turkey and, in a largely Islamic country, Women were often kept out of the police force by not being able to wear headscarves if serving, however, this ban was lifted in September 2016.

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35. France

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There are two police forces in France called “Police Nationale” and “Gendarmerie Nationale” with the Gendarmerie being a military branch. Women were initially hindered from entering the police force due to a French law from 1892 banned women from working at night. The ban wasn’t abolished by the French parliament until 2000

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36. Australia

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The police force in Australia is composed of different uniformed officers over a number of states.These police women pictured herein are from the South Australian police force whose images would represent more or less the type of women in the Australian police force

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These 19 Acts Of Kindness Prove That Police Officers Are Absolutely Awesome

On a daily basis, police officers protect innocent people and put criminals away.

This is a huge and important job in and of itself, but many of them take the time to make people’s lives easier — like the cops below. Whether they’re helping a person fix a flat tire or buying essential items for the homeless, these officers go above and beyond their duties in these awesome acts of kindness.

1. An officer tied a sick old man’s shoelaces for him.

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2. These kindhearted cops raised money and bought Christmas toys for sick children at the Ronald McDonald House in NYC.

3. These officers rescued a fawn that was trapped in a storm drain.

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4. Nobody from this kid’s class showed up to his birthday party, so state troopers brought a cake, presents, and even police dogs to his house and threw him a party he’ll never forget.

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5. This pig was stuck in a dumpster, but police pulled her out and one of them even adopted her.

6. A Pizza Hut driver got into a car accident, so these policemen delivered the pizza for him.

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7. When this autistic teen’s beloved Halloween lawn decoration was stolen, a thoughtful officer helped him recover it and even bought him another one for Christmas.

8. This guy bought some shoes for a homeless man and gave him one of his shirts.

9…Cop’s good deed helps father see son – YouTube

10. Officers in Saskatoon, Canada, went out of their way to escort a family of ducks through busy streets and into a safer area.

11. This man bought a little boy some food as a final act of kindness before getting killed in the line of duty.

12. This woman bought a homeless man some breakfast and kept him company.

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13. An off-duty officer risked his life to pull a man out of a burning car.

14. This officer helped a guy change his tire on a freeway.

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15. These officers came to school with this little boy to show him that he wasn’t alone. He had just lost his dad, who worked alongside them.

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16. Not only did this officer buy some coffee for the homeless man in the background, but he also brought him shoes and art supplies because he likes to draw.

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17. This cop helped an elderly woman cross the street to get to a 7-Eleven and then drove her back home when she was done.

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18. This adorable little boy saved his allowance for months to buy lunch for this police department, so they returned the favor by presenting him with his own cruiser.

19. These police bought with their own money groceries

Okay, the next time I see a police officer, I’m definitely going to have to give them a big high five for all the awesome work they do.

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Henry Sapiecha